Tag Archives: WIP Wednesday

This and That

Kitchen project update:

Remember that?:

Now it is this:

Remember that?:

Now it is this:

Fresh paint and new hardware.  Check!

Hubby is finishing up the glass cabinet doors, and then on to that floor!

The Widow’s Mite project update:

Applique pieces are being secured with free-motion zig-zag.

When the zig-zagging gets done, then I’ll stitch in some details with thread painting.

Update on the Weeding project:

Not so much.

What’s your progress?

March Free Motion Quilting Challenge

I am participating in the 2012 Free Motion Quilting Challenge over at SewCalGal.  The talented art quilter, Ann Fahl,  has written a tutorial for March.

Ann has suggested keeping a binder/journal of free motion quilting ideas.  That is something that I have already been doing and have referenced many times.  It is a very good suggestion.

Ann has also suggested learning meandering patterns other than stippling.  So I am practicing her stars and loops, spirals and spiral flowers.

I need alot more practice.

Doodling is not only fun, but helps to develop memory and make the motion come naturally when actually quilting on a project.

I warmed up with some feather practice.  I learned feathers from Diane Guadynski last month, and I am really enjoying these.  I’m gaining confidence.

I’m using a Schmetz 14 Jeans needle and some old Coats and Clark Dual Duty thread that I want to use up.  The tension is lowered slightly.  The batting is Cotton Classic.

I’ll need alot more practice with this month’s meandering!

So back to the sewing machine I go!

Free Motion Machine Quilting Challenge – February

Month (lesson) 2 of SewCalGal’s Free Motion Quilt Challenge.  Feathers.  One of the best free motion quilters is the guest teacher this month, and she knows feathers!  I printed out Diane Gaudynski’s lesson and started sketching out feathers. 

Whooo boy, do I need to practice up!  I don’t want to use stencils…I want to master fun, funky and free feathers all by myself!

For some reason, sketching these feathers is very stressful for me, so I need to loosen up.  A cup of tea, and a search for chocolate is in order.

Yeah, I know.  Desperate times.  It’s all I could find in the house.  Don’t tell Hubby!  

My first feather.  I had problems with skipped stitches.  I tried everything…changing needles, thread, tension, fabric.  I came to the conclusion that my machine may be having an issue.  I am determined.  I end up with a tea-dyed muslin scrap, Aurifil 50wt in the bobbin, WonderFil Tutti 50 wt. in the top, a Schmetz 10/70 needle, and a tension of 1-2.

I also chose to use separate colors in the top and bobbin, so I could really see tension issues.  In spite of skipped stitches, the tension actually looks great.

The back (clicking on any of the photos will get you a larger photo):

The next feather was done at a later time and shows improvement.  I was more relaxed and actually enjoying it.

However, my photos stink!  Sorry!

This time I’m using Mettler 60wt. in the top and Bottom Line in the bobbin (I like this combination).  Muslim is the same and again I am using a Schmetz 10/70 jeans needle.  No problems with skipped stitches.

I kept chanting to myself…around the corner…around the corner…around the corner.  Diane pointed out that feathers were made by rounding a coin.  When I remembered that, my feathers looked better.

These feathers are stitched side-by-side, so I’ll have a sampler to refer to later.

I can do this!

Orca Bay Mystery Quilt Part 8

It has been busy around here (mundane but necessary stuff), so I’m not accomplishing alot where sewing is concerned, but I am so happy I have completed the Orca Bay top!

The blocks that will become the pieced border:

Three borders sewn on:

I was going to stop with the white, pieced and black borders , but I thought it was too dark; that the top needs more color.

So I pieced an orange border:

And now the flimsy really is done.

It will be a while before Orca Bay gets quilted.  I’ve never used a long arm service before, but I am saving my pennies for this one.

If you’d like to see previous posts on my version of the Orca Bay mystery quilt, you can follow my progress (including an alternate layout I made using EQ7) by looking under Categories > Quilts in the side bar.

Or:

For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 1, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 2, click here.    
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 3, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 4, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 5, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 6, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 7, click here.

Orca Bay Mystery Quilt Part 7

My progress is slow, but steady.  This week I am putting the blocks together and sewing them into a flimsy, also known as a quilt top.

The suggested method by Bonnie Hunter is to sew this design row by row.  I prefer to sew sections of blocks together, so I have sectioned my quilt pattern.  If you click on the photo below, you can see it close-up.  This quilt is seven rows across by eight rows down.

I need sixteen of these larger blocks:

And twenty-four of these:

I also need four of these blocks:

And three of these blocks:

I will fill in with nine white stars.

I’m pressing my seams open:

Here’s a section of blocks ready to sew:

The upper left quadrant is sewn (four across and four down):

The entire flimsy is sewn and pressed.  Hmmm…what’s up with that orange block?  Is it turned the wrong direction?  IT IS!

Close-up (missed that wayward block):

I’m pleased…my star points are not as chopped as I thought they were going to be!

On to the borders!

If you’d like to see previous posts on my version of the Orca Bay mystery quilt, you can follow my progress (including an alternate layout I made using EQ7) by looking under Categories > Quilts in the side bar.

Or:

For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 1, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 2, click here.    
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 3, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 4, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 5, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 6, click here.
 

Orca Bay Mystery Quilt Part 5

Since I am not at home where I can finish sewing my version of Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay Mystery Quilt, I drew the design in EQ7This gave me much needed practice with EQ7, and a clear vision of the quilt.

In reading Yahoo Quiltville posts and link-ups, I’ve noticed that there has been some discussion on layouts.  One indeed must be careful about positioning the many blocks.  It is very easy to turn a block the wrong way.

I’ve only used color here to bring out the design of the quilt.  There are many terrific color combinations posted by Orca Bay participants.

The first layout shows Bonnie’s direction; the blue (red for Bonnie’s version) string triangle blocks all point to the light Ohio star blocks. 

In both layouts, the orange string blocks follow the diagonal lines of the layout and create a wonderful secondary design element.

The blue string blocks in Layout 2 all point to the dark Ohio stars.  This one change creates a dramatic difference in how the quilt looks.

There is no right or wrong; just personal preference.  You decide.

Addendum:
I just discovered that I forgot to turn a couple of orange blocks in Layout 1.  Like I said…it is easy to turn a block the wrong way in this quilt.  LOL!
 
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 1, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 2, click here.    
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 3, click here.
For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 4, click here.
 
 

Orca Bay Mystery Quilt Part 2

For Bonnie Hunter’s Orca Bay mystery quilt – Part 1, click here.

Part 2 mystery instructions calls for piecing 72 string blocks. Strings?  In a nutshell, string piecing is taking cut fabric strips, or scraps, and piecing them together, using a stabilizer for backing.  The stabilizer can be used dryer sheets, muslin, newsprint, interfacing, etc….  In my case, I’m using old phone book pages.  I had all 72 paper squares prepared in a very short time by simply tearing with the edge of my ruler. 

No rotary cutter necessary.  Simply tear.

I was very indecisive about what color these scrappy string blocks ought to be.  Should I use orange (one of my very favorite colors)?  How about yellows?  Then I remembered that one of my goals for doing this mystery is to ‘lighten up’; be random.  So…how about I use a warm palette?  Then I can have it all.

A fabulous, feel good warm pile of unsquared string blocks!

Pressed and peeling paper!  Oh, the excitement of it all!  The paper practically falls off when a short stitch length is used.

And a closer look.  What a funny bonus!  I did not notice what this phone book page said until I was snapping this photo.  I’m doing my part to go green!

Four of the string blocks, pressed, squared to 3.5″, and peeled.

These little babies are sweet!