Tag Archives: Steptoe Butte

Steptoe Butte and Steptoe Battlefield

Hubby and I took a road trip and visited Steptoe Butte State Park. This 3,612-foot butte is a wonderful place to visit and view the surrounding Palouse (a major fertile agricultural area; the most important lentil growing region in the USA). The steptoes, or hills, are formed from lava flows.

Steptoe Butte

*Clicking on a photo will give you a closer look!

Steptoe Butte
Steptoe Butte
Steptoe Butte

The butte is named after Lieutenant Colonel Edward Steptoe.

Steptoe Butte

Steptoe Butte is a popular area for hang gliders, kite flying, paragliders, model airplane fliers and sight seers.

Steptoe Butte

From a photographer’s point of view, the best times to visit are sunrise and sunset, but the views are spectacular at any time of the day or season.

Steptoe Butte

Nearby, one can also visit Steptoe Battlefield…a sober reminder of the Battle of Pine Creek, where a conflict between  US Army forces under Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Edward Steptoe and members of the Coeur d’Alene, Palouse and Spokane Native American tribes took place.

Steptoe Battlefield

The land did not look so pastoral then. It was not farmed; it was scrubland and native grasses.

Steptoe Battlefield

Because of the many hills, it was also a difficult land in which to fight battles.

Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield
Steptoe Battlefield

The willingness of America’s veterans to sacrifice for our country has earned them our lasting gratitude. -Jeff Miller

*I am in no way condoning any conflicts with anyone, only commemorating every veteran’s loss of life in the performance of his/her duty.

God bless the veterans!

Palouse Falls

Hubby had a fabulous idea for another impulsive day trip.  We called Dad to see if he’d like to come, packed up our lunch and headed south to Palouse Falls State Park.

Palouse Falls

Palouse Falls is a scenic gem that is nearly hidden in the scablands and canyons of southeastern Washington State.  It you want to visit a place that is off the beaten path, then this is the place for you.

Palouse Falls

There are many hiking trails and it is possible to hike to the bottom of the waterfall, or up around the top, or even behind the waterfall where the Palouse River cuts through the scabland.  Some trails are paved, many are not.  Rock climbing is allowed here too.

Palouse Falls Marmots

The falls plunge 186 feet and, incredibly, you don’t see it until you are nearly on top of it.

Palouse Falls

The orange that you see in the photos are rock climbers.

Palouse Falls

We were treated to gentle rain showers on our visit, and we had a very pleasant day.  I’m proud of my Dad; he’s in his 80’s and recently had knee replacement surgery.  Yet, he’s out here hiking!  I really do come from great stock!

Palouse Falls Dad

The Palouse River behind the falls:

Palouse Falls

Up on a plateau:

Palouse Falls

On the way home, we visited Steptoe Butte State Park.  The butte is an unexpected height reigning over a sea of agricultural land.  It is named for Edward Steptoe, a colonel in the US Army, who, in May of 1858, was defeated by 1000 Indian warriors in a battle near here.

Steptoe Butte

Steptoe Butte  is a great place for kite flying, hang gliding, picnicking and just taking in the view.

Steptoe Butte

Serene.

Clicking on a photo will give you a larger look.