Buffalo Bill Center of the West 6

For previous posts sharing my visit to this fantastic museum complex, click here:

Buffalo Bill Center of the West Introduction

Buffalo Bill Center of the West 2

Buffalo Bill Center of the West 3

Buffalo Bill Center of the West 4

Buffalo Bill Center of the West 5

Continuing on:

*Clicking on a photo will give you a closer look!

To the right of those beautiful spoons is an item called a tipi knocker…the Native American version of the door knocker:

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Made from porcupine quills:

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

“Near the flag of truce, a mother was shot down with her infant.  The child, not knowing that its mother was dead, was still nursing, and that especially was a very sad sight.  The women, as they were fleeing with their babies, were killed together, shot right through, and the women who were very heavy with child were also killed.”  -American Horse, Oglala Lakota (Sioux), testimony at council held by delegations of Sioux with Commissioner of Indian Affairs on the Wounded Knee massacre, February 11, 1891, Washington D.C.

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

Buffalo Bill Center of the West

To be continued.

10 responses to “Buffalo Bill Center of the West 6

  1. Hi Laura! That porcupine piece is lovely and they were original up-cyclers. I’m sure the porcupine quills fall out seasonally so you would collect them for free. I don’t know that I’d find a purpose for them! The Wounded Knee massacre – well, I really have no words for that. I question whether we have learned anything from our past transgressions, and I fear the answer is no. ~smile~ Roseanne

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  2. I think the Plains Indians were extremely creative and talented in the use of the natural materials surrounding their culture!

    It seems to me, that no matter where in the world that man in general has committed evil towards one another, he never really learns from it. I explain it away with the desire for power and greed, but I don’t understand committing the horror…I never will.

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  3. The Lakota are an enormously creative and artistic people. I was always amazed and the incredible doodles that our youth center kids did. Art just poured out of their fingers!

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  4. Pingback: Buffalo Bill Center of the West 7 | LC's Cottage

  5. This is fascinating! I’m learning a lot from visiting the Buffalo Bill Center via your camera 🙂

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    • Thank you for letting me know that, Allison! I learned so much there myself, and yet, there is so much more that I could see if I had the time to spend. 🙂

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  6. Pingback: Buffalo Bill Center of the West 8 | LC's Cottage

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